Kids, Complex Trauma, and Medication – The Great Debate Continued. by Chuck Geddes, Ph.D. This post will offer some thoughts on the use of psychotropic medications for children and youth with complex trauma histories. This post is a follow-up on my previous post on this topic https://www.complextrauma.ca/complex-trauma-medications/. I’ve had a chance to speak to some child psychiatrists and I have also been learning from a webinar series on Psychopharmacology and Trauma hosted by Dr. Bruce Perry and the Child Trauma Academy. …

Complex Trauma and Medications by Chuck Geddes, Ph.D. This post will offer some thoughts on the use of psychotropic medications for children and youth with complex trauma histories.  In a previous post, Complex Trauma and Assessment {https://www.complextrauma.ca/complex-trauma-assessment/ }, I wrote about a young boy named David and how typical psychiatric assessment processes resulted in him receiving seven different diagnoses to describe the variety of emotional and behavioural challenges he was exhibiting.  Our premise is that this assessment and diagnostic process …

CCI in a Cross-Cultural Setting by: Dr. Kirk Austin Baako cried incessantly at the orphanage, where he was a resident.  When Jake and Sarah stepped off the plane in Zimbabwe, thrilled to adopt this little 3-year-old boy, they were excited, curious and a tad bit anxious.  They arrived home to Canada and after a number of months, were overwhelmed as to how to settle him.  He would cry every time Sarah was out of eyesight and he was so exceptionally …

Why Keeping a Developmental Perspective is Critical when Working with Complex Trauma by Dr. Chuck Geddes As we continue working with children and youth who have extensive trauma histories and exhibit severe behavioural problems, it is becoming increasingly apparent to me that establishing and keeping a developmental perspective is a crucial goal.  This perspective helps in numerous ways.  First, it helps the team, and particularly the caregivers, to keep the child’s developmental age in mind and to reframe their view …

Reducing the Impact of ACEs: A CCI Program Evaluation By: Dr. Kirk Austin The Adverse Childhood Experiences Summit: BC & Beyond was held at the Sheraton Wall Centre in Vancouver BC on November 14th and 15th, 2017. As a partnership between the Doctors of BC and the BC government, the Shared Care Committee invited members of the educational, medical, and healthcare fields to discuss the latest research on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Over 600 people attended each of the days, …

Complex Trauma and Assessment by Dr. Chuck Geddes We received a referral last month for a young 10 yr old boy. (We’ll call him David although that isn’t his real name.) David was referred for help because none of the existing services were making a difference with his extreme behaviour. David had recently been suspended from school for the 4th time in the first 4 weeks of school. He was seen to be having regular “meltdowns” in which he would …

In my previous post, I talked about the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACEs) and how this is beginning to shake the foundation of how we view mental health problems. Take the ACEs test here The ACEs study points to a powerful connection between stressful childhood experiences and how it can create lifelong difficulties for people in health, relationships, education, and employment. ACE researchers have mapped out the connections.  They say that accumulated ACEs lead to the following steps: Disrupted Brain …

What if we were able to identify a common thread to be found at the root of many health and mental health concerns? The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study is shaking the very foundations of how we have perceived illness and its causes. So much so that researchers are touting ACEs as the number one (#1) factor in life long health outcomes.  It has been called the “largest, most important public health study you’ve never heard of.”  Here is a …

The growing science of child development and trauma should cause us to examine all of our practices and policies if we claim to be working in the best interests of children.  Within Child Welfare much policy is built on the framework of either key VALUES (e.g. “Kids need to be in school so they learn how to get along with others”), or they are built from a RIGHTS orientation – what are the child’s rights, the parent’s right, etc.  While …