Why Self Care is Essential When Supporting Traumatized Children Joanna has been a foster parent for nearly 20 years. She has cared deeply for all of the children who have lived with her and she has done her very best to help them heal and recover. Lately though, she has been feeling bone-tired. There doesn’t seem to be much joy left, it feels like there is always too much to do and nothing that she is doing with the kids …

“I hate you!” Screamed 6-year-old Lily, her face scrunched up into a snarl. “I hope you die and all your kids die too!” Her foster mom, Jen took a deep breath. Sometimes keeping the attitude of being playful, accepting, curious and empathic (PACE) that Daniel Hughes suggests is key in working with traumatized children felt impossible. “Oh, Lily I see you’re upset. You must be really mad that you have to put away something fun. I get that it would …

Reducing the Impact of ACEs: A CCI Program Evaluation By: Dr. Kirk Austin The Adverse Childhood Experiences Summit: BC & Beyond was held at the Sheraton Wall Centre in Vancouver BC on November 14th and 15th, 2017. As a partnership between the Doctors of BC and the BC government, the Shared Care Committee invited members of the educational, medical, and healthcare fields to discuss the latest research on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Over 600 people attended each of the days, …

Working with Complex Trauma is Challenging: Increasing Resilience by: Dr. Kirk Austin Resilience is a funny word. It means to bounce back, to rebound, or to recover. It is an essential life-skill that can lead to healthy identity development.  Sarah Hamill believes that resilience typically refers to the development of competence in the face of adversity. More specifically, it refers to a dynamic process of positive adaptation and development while simultaneously facing a significant amount of adversity (Luthar, Cicchetti & …

Factors that can influence the level of Care Team Functionality by David Brown I have been reflecting on my behaviour during some recent events, meetings and interactions with both colleagues and friends. I noticed with significant disappointment how often I would hesitate to say something due to my own uncertainty regarding whether, by saying it, I might look foolish, uninformed or in some way not as competent as I wanted to present myself to be. It struck me that even …